PACE committee calls for ‘integrity studies’ in schools and universities to fight corruption

With the right support, young people can bring “a new culture of integrity” to all levels of society, PACE’s Culture Committee has said.

Approving a draft report by Eleonora Cimbro (Italy, SOC), the committee said educating young people from the earliest age – beginning in kindergarten – to stand up against corruption was central to success. It called for “integrity studies” in national school and university curricula, “including both the aspects of personal values and ethical behaviour and a human rights based approach”.

“The more young people take the lead, the more chance there is that anti-corruption policies will succeed,” the parliamentarians pointed out. Young people were more likely to be creative, innovative, forward-thinking and to make better use of modern technologies in combating corruption, they added.

The report will be debated by the full Assembly in due course.